Creative Quarantine: Metalsmith/Artist Lisa Colby

Artist/Metalsmith Lisa Colby | Photo Credit: Sarah Hooker of Virago Boudoir

1. How are you holding up?

I’m doing as well as can be expected right now. My sense of time and what day it is has thrown me off my pins, though!

2. Has Covid-19 had an effect on your work? If so, in what way?

This pandemic has altered the way I sell my work at this time. I usually travel to various cities and do art fairs where I sell my jewelry and connect with my customers in person. I am currently selling my work online. The galleries who represent me have had to use Instagram or their websites to showcase their artists. I live in North Carolina, so our state has been on lockdown since March 12th. In the beginning, I felt really dazed and I assumed my business would tank, but much to my surprise, many of my collectors have reached out to me.  I think people want to be surrounded by beauty right now more than ever. I’m glad to be able to contribute a portion of my sales to various charities who are helping vulnerable communities right now.  A fun project which I just got involved with is the Hand Medal Project. It’s a global community of metalsmiths who are hand sawing metal ex-votos to give to healthcare workers around the world as a thanks to their amazing work.


Photo credit: Cole Rodger

3. Is there anything you’ve added to your practice that you’d like to keep after this is over?

The biggest thing I’ve learned from this time is to slow down and not stress too much about working long hours like I usually do. This time has allowed me to prioritize how I balance my time between studio work and experimenting in my kitchen. My new obsession is making no-knead bread and I’m about to embark on foraging wildflowers to make jelly. I’m becoming a homesteader right now!

4. Of the artists you follow, who’s handling this particularly well?

Eleanor Anderson is always inspiring, especially now. She’s a multidisciplinary artist who has been using IG stories to teach how to’s. One, in particular, was “weave in place” where she demonstrated how to make a miniature weaving using a credit card as a loom. Another friend, Henrik Drescher has been using Maybelline eyeliner to make beautiful drawings.



Short Bio:
Studio metal smith
Publications: “1,000 Rings” and “500 Silver Jewelry Designs”, Lark Press
Select representation:  Penland Gallery,  Penland , NC
Metals Museum, Memphis, TN
Craft Alliance Center of Art and Design, St. Louis, MO
Mora Asheville, NC
website: www.lisacolby.com   IG lisacolby65